Linking Research

Posts Tagged ‘Semantic Web’

Science, Semantic Web and Excuses

Posted by dgarijov on May 10, 2013

We have just published our proposal for the “Call for Polemics” at Sepublica 2013 (ESWC). Check it out here!: http://www.oeg-upm.net/files/polemics/

The document critizices the actual semantic publishing practices and proposes a set of requirements that all authors should accomplish when submitting a research work. In the near future we would like to include examples from our environment (complete and incomplete) in order to illustrate our proposal.

If you wish to contribute with additional ideas/suggestions, please do it in this thread.

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Annotating your personal page with RDF-a

Posted by dgarijov on February 27, 2013

A couple of weeks ago some members of the OEG and me organized a small tutorial about RDF-a  to the rest of the group (also known as the First OEG RDF-a Collaborative Tripleton). The final goal was to provide an overview and eat our own dog food by annotating our personal web pages with some simple RDF-a statements. The bait, some free pizza:

Participantes enjoying their pizza. It always works

Participants enjoying their pizza. It always works

People were very participative, and we discussed some examples during the tutorial. Given the fact that nobody was an expert in RDF-a, I think that the overall experience was very useful for everyone.
Therefore, if you want to annotate your page with some RDF-a statements, I have prepared a small guideline below listing the main common steps to take into consideration. The guidelines are based on what we discussed on the tutorial and later:

1)      Distinguish your web page from yourself: Don’t use the URL of your home page as your URI. Instead, create a URI for yourself. For example, my personal page is: http://delicias.dia.fi.upm.es/members/DGarijo/. If I want to describe the page (title, creation date, etc), I would use that URL. If I want to add some descriptive statements about myself (name, email, phone, etc.) then I can use http://delicias.dia.fi.upm.es/members/DGarijo/#me. This is a recognized good practice, although you can use any identifier for yourself as long as you control the domain where you create it. Another could have been: http://delicias.dia.fi.upm.es/members/DGarijo/#DanielGarijo

2)      Provide at least a minimum set of statements about yourself: If you provide some information in html for users, why not in RDF-a for machines? Add your name, an image, phone, email, institution, a link to your publications, the institutions you are working for, past and present projects, etc.

3)      Use widely used vocabularies like schema and foaf for describing yourself, Dublin Core to describe the document and, if you want to state the provenance of the document itself, you may even use the PROV standard.

4)      Try to use existent authoritative URIs for the resources you are describing. Linking to other resources is always better than creating your own URIs. If you don’t know the URI for an institution or a project you can always create your own and add an owl:sameAs once you know the good one. But you can try looking up in DBpedia or Sindice for existent ones.

5)      Validate your RDF-a! Before publishing, be sure to test the statements you have produced with an RDF validator like this one.

Do you want to know more? Check out the RDF-a Primer! It’s full of examples and it is very easy to follow.

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