Tag: MINT

Report: International Congress on Environmental Modelling and Software (iEMSs)

Last week I attended the 9th edition of iEMSs in Fort Collins, Denver. IEMSs is a bi-annual conference that brings together between 300 and 400 researchers from software engineering, intelligent systems, environmental modeling and decision making domains (among others). There were very few people that knew about ontologies and Semantic Web, which makes it a unique experience to learn about the problems from other communities. Going to this kind of events (outside of your community of expertise) has been eye opening for me in the past, and I cannot recommend it enough. Get out of your community bubble once in a while J

What was I doing at iEMSs?

I attended the conference to present 3 papers about our Model Integration project (MINT). The papers describe an overview of the project, in which we aim to reduce the time required to integrate together models from climate, hydrology, agriculture, economics and social sciences. In addition, we introduce a new approach to describe model variables and processes using the Ontosoft software registry and our plan to integrate Pegasus and Emely for efficient model coupling. More information is available in the conference program (hopefully our papers will soon be available in the conference proceedings as well). Overall, the presentations were well received and I was glad to learn that there is huge interest in some of the problems we are tackling, such as the description of models to facilitate their reusability or enabling model coupling.

AWESOME Keynotes

One of the best parts of the conference were the keynotes. Temple Grandin started on Monday with a cry for acceptance of visual thinkers (“I see risk, other people try to measure it!”) together with the need to get closer to the infrastructure we use every day. Get out of the office and get your hands dirty once in a while!

Nick Clinton followed up on Tuesday with an introduction to Google Earth (see slides). It looks like Google has invested a lot into bringing together earth data (more than 7 PB) and infrastructure to create an environment for scientist to do their science. All for free (for researchers), using Javascript and Python interfaces and with access to a bunch of machine learning algorithms. It’s also easy to create time lapses of areas of interest, allowing to show real time evolution of parts of earth for the last 30 years.

The last keynote speaker was Thomas Vilsack, former US Secretary of Agriculture under the Obama administration. This is the first keynote I have seen given by a politician, with no slides and a direct but compelling speech. The speaker tackled several problems related to modeling, from the role of science in different debates (GMOs and climate change) to the need for new sustainable solutions given the increase of population around the globe. How can we make models that convince farmers and policy makers about the long term consequences of their actions? How can models be used to increase the productivity per individual acre? Can we find solutions so we become better consumers of food? How can we reduce and reuse food waste?

Highlights:

Given that many sessions happened in parallel, this is a personal vision with the highlights of the talks I attended to:

  • Ibrahim Demir’s FloodAI is a very cool approach that mixes science with visual explanations early detection observations. They have done an impressive amount of work to be able to communicate their results with chat bots. No wonder why he won a conference award!
  • Alexei Voinov described surveys, tools and methods for participatory modeling. Remaining challenges are a) people tend to use the tools and models they are more familiar with, rather than experiment new ones in different contexts; b) Failure in method execution is not reported.
  • Ruth Falconer (University of Abertay) and the use of videogames in environmental modeling.

  • Eric Hutton (CSDMS) introduced PYMT, a model coupling framework in Python.
  • RODOS, an European decision support system designed as a consequence of Chernobyl’s nuclear accident. There are so many different processes involved, from wind to soil deposition of contamination.
  • The Nexus tools platform for model comparison. Currently they have 84 models and counting!
  • Sarah Mubareka’s report on integration of models of biomass supply. Creating accurate indicators for estimating biomass in Europe is a real challenge, as everyone one uses different definitions and metrics in their country.
  • Natalia Villanueva’s interface for scenario simulation in Rio Grande. I really like the effort they have put into make their results understandable by stakeholders.
  • TMDL, a mechanism to remediate impaired water bodies

See you in Brussels 2020!

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