Tag: geosciences

Deploying sensors between a volcano and a hurricane: The IS-GEO 2018 Summer Institute

Deploying sensors between a volcano and a hurricane: The IS-GEO 2018 Summer Institute

A few weeks ago I had the pleasure to attend the second IS-GEO summer institute, in Hawaii. The meeting was led by Suzanne Pierce and Daniel Fuka, who managed to bring together more than 40 participants with different background and expertise. From the environmental sciences side, we had researchers specialized in areas such as Hydrology, Ecology or Meteorology. From the intelligent systems side, we had experts in sensor handling and deployment, data analytics, data integration, reproducibility and data visualization. We participated together by assembling and deploying hand-made sensors in the 8 different ecosystems of Hawaii’s Big Island. All while the volcano was still active and hurricane Hector approached from the south-east! But let me go step by step.

What is IS-GEO?

For those who are not familiar with the organization, IS-GEO (https://is-geo.org) is a Research Collaboration Network (RCN) funded by NSF through the EarthCube program that aims to bring together researchers from Intelligent Systems (IS) and Geosciences (GEO). The RCN has had presence in top conferences like AGU, where it has led a session for the last couple of years. In addition, we organize (yes, I am part of the RCN as well) monthly teleconferences where we invite an expert from either the IS or GEO side to talk about their latest research. Have a look here: https://is-geo.org/resources/research-presentations/

Exploring NEW research, not just exposing previous work

From the very beginning, the objectives of the event were made clear: collaborate together, define new challenges, enhance communication among attendants and finally define potential robust collaborations. These objectives are key in interdisciplinary conversations, as a fruitful collaboration will only happen when both sides are interested in different aspects of the same research problem. The program was structured so we would have a few presentations during the morning and then spend some times crafting sensors and deploying them in the afternoon. There were different teams with flexible structure and we spent quite some time in the vans when going to the field, which allowed everyone to talk to everyone else about their expertise and interests.

An unexpected guest: Hurricane Hector

Hurricane Hector introduced a change of plans. Instead of deploying just a few initial stations, we decided to prioritize sensor deployment during the first days, and then see if by the end of the week we could visualize actual data that could measure the impact of the hurricane. We had a quick introduction to the different type of sensors, and I was amazed how Arduino and open hardware initiatives have facilitated the integration and reading from them. It makes you want to create a small sensor station at your home!

Daily meteorological reports

One of the perks of being surrounded by scientists is that we had access to the local meteorologist, Harry Halpin, who provided reports of the movement of Hector every day before starting the sessions. Supercool!

It was also thanks to him that we were able to come close to the lava cam (http://lavacam.org/), which reports continuously about the status of the volcano. And take pictures of the recent lava burst, such as this one:

2018-08-07 01.18.21

Building and planting sensors on the field:

We managed to deploy several sensor/weather stations in different ecosystems of the island. Some were deployed in some of the houses of the attendants, such as Dan Fuka’s backyard:

But some others were deployed in further points of the island. In this case, several attendants are setting up a weather station near a Buddhist temple:

2018-08-08 00.25.49

Or near a mountain, on an old lava field. The dome is a research facility to simulate the living conditions in mars:

2018-08-08 23.08.21

Visualizing data:

Once the stations were set, we connected them to the CHORDS platform and visualized them in a map (http://is-geo.chordsrt.com/sites/map). Mike Daniels explained how all data is available for download, and how to set up stations that register new data in CHORDS. Unfortunately, we didn’t have much time to do data analysis, but learning about the data acquisition process is a valuable lesson for all the attendants. Collecting data requires hard work, and integrating and visualizing it to make it useful is full of challenges, from sensor calibration to error detection.

Personal collaboration outcomes and takeaways:

I wish there were more events like this one, combining a potential asset to the community (a data product that reflects the impact of Hector and future hurricanes) with hands on sessions that explain how to create, program and collect data from sensors. I now appreciate more the amount of work that goes into the data collection process. Furthermore, I hadn’t created any circuit for a long time. It’s always good to refresh your memory with some Arduino hands on.

During the week, I also had the chance of collaborating with Suzanne Pierce and Daniel Hardesty-Lewis to create workflows for groundwater modeling. In fact, we were able to describe in a machine readable manner how to invoke Modflow with different recharge files and add it to a model registry. With a little more effort, we will be able to also connect this work to data collected by a platform such as CHORDS.

Other highlights:

  • Planet Texas 2050 is going to be big! Created after hurricane Harvey’s disaster, this project is going to deploy a whole new cyberinfrastructure to study climate variations, track the impact of pumping and trying to predict how to irrigate different regions. I hope we can collaborate within our MINT project (see last bullet point)
  • The Ronin Institute looks like a great organization to apply for research grants when you can’t change locations.
  • IkeWai, like Planet Texas 2050, will set up a sensor infrastructure for data analysis. Many opportunities for data analysis!
  • Privacy and sensor data: There are many open questions on who should own sensor data when installed on private property. On the one hand, sensors could give away personal information about the owner. On the other hand, sensors could be exploited to detect illegal activities, such as water pollution.
  • Grafana is looking great for sensor data visualization. You can even configure alerts!
  • [Self promotion :D] I gave a presentation and demo on our Model INTegration (MINT) project, where we are trying to bring together models from economy, agronomy, hydrology and meteorology to answer important questions about a region. The project is only 6 months old, but so far we are doing great progress! See our IEMSs paper for a full description of MINT!
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EarthCube All Hands Meeting (ECAHM 2018)

EarthCube All Hands Meeting (ECAHM 2018)

Last week I attended the annual EarthCube All Hands Meeting (ECAHM) in Alexandria, Washington. Since it’s been a while since I last wrote my last post, I think it would be interesting to share my notes and highlights here for anyone who missed the event.

ECAHM meetings are usually very enriching experiences, as they bring together a variety of researchers from different fields related to geosciences, ranging from computer scientists to volcanologists or marine biologists. The purpose of the meeting is to gather the community together and hear everyone report back from their EarthCube NSF funded projects, which are targeted towards improving cyber-infrastructure in the geosciences. As a computer scientist, I think this is a great meeting to attend for two main reasons: first, you always learn something new, even if it’s not in your domain. Second, people are extremely grateful to your contributions, as you are helping them become more effective when doing their science.

So, what was I doing at ECAHM 2018?

I attended the meeting to present our latest progress in OntoSoft, a distributed software metadata registry we created at ISI to facilitate scientists describe their software. You can see the poster abstract online (and soon the poster itself). I also participated on a “speed-dating session”, where I got to discuss for half an hour how to describe software with a domain scientist; and I substituted Yolanda Gil in a panel for external partnership opportunities, where I presented the Open Knowledge Network initiative. This effort, led by NITRD, is a great opportunity of creating a shared open knowledge graph that would be used for both research and industry to refine and curate its contents. The idea is that this knowledge graph becomes part of the US infrastructure the same way supercomputers currently are, so anyone could benefit from it and also contribute to it. It looks like the NSF is keen to pursue this objective too.

Two colleagues of mine also presented other initiatives I am involved in. Deborah Khider showcased our efforts towards structuring metadata and creating standards in the paleoclimate sciences, together with a set of tools that a team of paleo-climate scientists have developed to work with that structured data. She also managed to mix Star Wars and Star Trek themes in her poster and presentation, which was well received by the attendants (I think everyone stopped at her poster)

Jo Martin presented the IS-GEO research collaboration network, where we are bringing in experts from geosciences and intelligent systems to foster new collaborations. We hold a monthly meeting where we have every time a different researcher talking about their latest work! Check it out here: https://is-geo.org/resources/research-presentations/

About the keynotes:

As expected, keynotes at ECAHM are nothing like venues such as AAAI or IUI. The first speaker was Dean Pesnell (NASA) and he presented the research carried out by his team on studying the sun and sun spots. Why is this related to geosciences? Because the sun could be considered “our ground truth for the universe”, and anything related to its activity has many implications in any of the fields of geosciences. Their main problem is how to analyze the amount of data that they have. Each of their datasets may contain several hundred million images, so proper metadata is crucial (you don’t want to find out you have downloaded 300 million images for nothing). Dean showed some impressive videos of their observations of the sun, as well as their pipelines to handle “very big data” analyses.

The second speaker was Sarah Stamps, and she talked about continental rift and the Tanzania Volcano observatory. Apparently, geologists are one of the few people in the word who would run towards an erupting volcano, instead of away from it. Sarah described the EARS system (East African Rift System) they are setting up, and how they teamed up with CHORDS to enable real time analysis of the observations they measure on the field. Thanks to her work, they are developing an early warning system for hazard detection! Sarah was departing soon to set a few more observing stations in the field, so best of luck!!

The third speaker was Caroline S. Wagner, who gave some metrics on the social side of interdisciplinary collaboration across disciplines. Science has become increasingly collaborative and team based, and the number of international collaborations have doubled in the past years. The number of countries producing 95% of research has gone from 7 to 15, which indicates we are moving in the right direction. However, more than 50% of the articles are currently never cited. A few takeaways from this talk are: 1) International collaborations start face to face, so go to different events and meet new people; 2) Diverse teams usually take longer to be productive, as people don’t usually speak the same language. Be patient!!; 3) Work towards a solution, not towards interdisciplinar teams. Interdisciplinarity should be the means to an end, not the end itself.

Other highlights

Below are some additional highlights I found interesting for the EarthCube community.

  • Eva Zanzerika reported on the NSF 10 Big Ideas, which nicely summarize the interests of the agency in terms of funding in the next years. The report has been out since more than 1 year ago, but it’s never too late to catch up!
  • Doug Fils presented their plan for turning P418 turning into something bigger. In case you don’t know, P418 currently tracks the metadata of datasets exposed as schema.org and aggregates it in a search engine (a search engine for scientific data). Future plans are to ingest other types of resources and make the code base stable.
  • Interesting working lunch idea: A napkin drawing exercise. Do you know how to present your idea with a simple sketch?
  • Simon Goring (and Scott Peckham): How do we measure success on a huge program such as Earthcube?
  • PANGEO: Big data in the geosciences (but without reinventing the wheel!)
  • ASSET: Or how to incorporate existing tools into your workflows by drawing sketches! Workflows are important! Two different studies may obtain results even if the original data is the same:

  • I got an award for community service 🙂 :